Switch / Charge Jack

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A high quality, low profile, glider switch jack.

Switch / Charge Jack

Switch Jack 150mm

$6.20
Switch / Charge Jack

Switch Jack 300mm

$6.40
OR
  • DESCRIPTION
  • The Switch Jack is the reliable and convenient way to control your plane's electrical system, as well as charging your flight batteries without removing the canopy! I will explain for those of you who are unfamiliar with using this method. The switch jack method uses an electrical connector comprised of two components, the male plug and the female receptacle. The receptacle is threaded through a hole in the fuselage and is held in place with a nut. If you are installing it into a foam plane the jack can be simply glued into the fuse. The receptacle contains a switch that is triggered when you insert the plug. The plane's electrical system is "on" when the plug is removed from the jack. When you insert the plug into the jack, the plane's electrical system turns "off" and a connection to the flight battery is established through the plug. The plug is provided with a 2 inch power cable terminated with a JR style servo connection that plugs into your battery charger.

    After designing the prototypes, we worked with our manufacturer to find a power jack that we would feel confident flying in our own planes. This lead to a robust switch contact. The jack we decided to use is strong, lightweight, and has a low profile. The jack protrudes into the fuselage less than one half inch, as the leads are soldered to the sides of the jack instead of the bottom.

    What you get:

    • We offer the Switch Jack with 2 different lead lengths, 150mm (7 3/8") and 300mm (13 3/8")
    • Each Switch Jack comes with two charge plugs. One straight plug and one 90° plug

    FYI:  At the rear of the Switch Jack is an exposed conductor carrying positive power from the battery (See pics). Under normal circumstances this is a non issue, but we feel it is important for you to be aware of it. If it is a concern, the conductor can be easily insulated in a number of different ways. Hot glue, a dab of Plasti Dip, even a few coats of enamel model paint will provide reasonable insulation.